The Artistic World of K.L.Storer



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Jul-Sep, 2023
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Mon, Jul 3, 2023

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PREPRODUCTION IS PLUGGING ALONG:

WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
DTG Director icon
I'm still making more director's script study passes through the play, still focusing on characters more than other things, but not ignoring them either. In the other aspects, I'm especially noting where I might or might not put production music and specific sound effects.

That idea that I might compose the production music is pretty much becoming the overwhelming likelihood. The scene change music will be quite short, and may be bass guitar work. There's also a suggestion in the script of a particular known song to go out of Act 1, and I'm seriously thinking recording an instrumental cover of that song for tha spot. Then I might stick the original recording in as the first song of the intermission music.

So, I'll be finally pulling my music equipment out again, and sometime soon, I'd say. Now to also be going on to filling out the production staff.

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At my desk in my office space, reading and making notes in my large-print copy of the Wednesday's Child script.

ANOTHER VACATION & RECREATION EVENT UP:

VOCAL WORK ICON
Spring Vacation 2022
It took a few weeks of off-and-on work, but I now have the pages for my Spring Vacation 2022 done and up on the site.

In Concert icon
SPRING VACATION 2022 PAUL McCARTNEY GOT BACK CONCERT BUTTON
Though the pages feature another stay at Hocking Hills, as well as a visit to Zoo Knoxville, and a great several days at Norris Dam State Park, being a major Beatle fan and an uber-major Paul McCartney fan, the big highlight for me is the evening in Knoxville at the McCartney "Got Back Tour" show.

I believe I have already explained that I will be gradually transferring many blog entries into this new subcategory of Vacation & Recreation. But the first thing will be to move forward and add the things since Spring Vacation 2022. Next will be my Summer Staycation 2022, which will include my thrid time seeing stand-up comic Jim Gaffigan, a camping trip to Caesar Creek State Park, and also my third time seeing seeing Sheryl Crow in concert. That will be followed by FutureFest 2022, and then my September camping trip to Stonelick State Park, which includes a stop at the very cool Loveland Castle & Museum (Chateau Laroche).

After that I'll backtrack and transfer vacations and more elaborate reports of my attendance at shows (theatre, concerts, etc.) from regular blog entries to Vacation & Recreation. Of course, you can count on none of this occuring in any sort of quick, timely manner. It's gonna be another case of in a gradual manner.



Idependence Day 2023

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Image of the top of page 1 of the Declaration of Independence, with the date, "July 4, 1776," and the large words "We the People."



Fri, Jul 7, 2023

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Happy Birthday RINGO - with a picture of Ringo Starr giving the peacxe sign



Tue, Jul 11, 2023

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AND PREPRODUCTION CONTINUES:

WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
DTG Director icon
Well, some production crew staffing is still in the air, but the effort to fill those positions is still underway. Meanwhile other preproduction is progressing.

Script Analysis icon
The passes through, reading the play, doing all sorts of different script study is continuing. I'm still paying attention to character analysis, as well as now focusing more on technical and mechanical things, such as where specific costume needs will be needed, some initial ideas about light focus on particular parts of the set, some thoughts on set geography, looking at set piece and prop needs, and sound design needs (SFX & production music).

Scenic Design icon
Next week I'll meet with our scenic designer, Red Newman, to discuss the set design. Of course, I'll bring in my concepts for the stage, but will certainly be open to whatever ideas comes from his fertile, creative mind. There are a couple things I have in mind that are a must, but I can't conceive he'll have a problem with those concepts; and I look forward to the magic he's going to bring to the table.

SOUND DESIGNING ICON
Musical Composition
Though sound design has not technically began, I am forming concepts as I do my script study. I've already written that I plan to compose production music for the show, certainly the opening music and the curtain call music, but also scene transition music. Unless something happens to change my mind, I believe the music is all, or mostly, going to be bass-guitar based compositions and performances. There are some specific sound effects that may be a part of some of the music, but I haven't made my mind up on that just yet. As to whether it'll be bass guitar only or if other instruments will be involved, such as a programmed drum kit part, I don't know that yet, either, though I'm leaning toward at least some of the scene-transition music being bass only.

The scene-transition music pieces will usually be short. There won't often be a need for anything longer than perhaps ten seconds. They are often going to be there solely as markers for specific sorts of shifts in the story, especially time bounces. I'll be making decisions about exactly what mood and feel each transition needs in presently-upcoming script-study readings.

I am also noting what other sound effects are needed, both those that the script specifically calls for and those my sound designer instincts will feel should be added.

AUDITION SIDES ICON
The casting call for the show states, "stay tuned for the availability of audition asides, which will be coming by mid July." Clearly it's time to get on those. Picking the sides and making them available is an eminent priority. The casting call also says "Auditions will consist of cold readings from the script," which for those who've grabbed the sides, will not necessarily be true ‐‐ more like slightly-chilled to room-temperature readings ‐‐ but I'll bet a lot of auditioning actors will not have downloaded the sides, so it will be cold readings for them.

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More script analysis, again at my desk in my apartment office space, last Saturday evening.

UPCOMING OPPORTUNITIES:

ACTING ICON
There are a couple acting gig possibilities coming up. One is professional (i.e.: there's a paycheck) and is pretty much a lock. The other is non-professional and will involve an audition, so, is not a lock.

The Human Race Theare Company icon
PROFESSIONAL GIG ICON
ART IN THE CITY logo.
The paying gig will be acting in a troupe for this year's Dayton Art in the City festival on August 5. Like last August, The Human Race will be doing a Playwright Race ‐‐ a 24-hour play, where a suggestion for a play scripts will be taken by playwrights on Friday evening, then each playwright, a director, and a small cast will meet and discuss. Then playwrights will write a short plays, overnight. Then each group will meet Saturday morning and rehearse. Then in the afternoon at the festival, the troupes will perform the plays several times in different locations in downtown Dayton. I did it last year and it was a blast.

FOR THE LOVE OF THE CRAFT ICON
AUDITION ICON
The non-pro gig, which will likely involve a screentest, possibly a DIY screentest, will be for a locally-produced web series. However, a big issue for me is schedule conflicts. The producers hope to wrap the project before the end of 2023, and I have chunks of time where I won't be available, especially during rehearsals for Wednesday's Child. I've been encouraged to still audition as there is flexibility.


THE PHYSICAL CD DILEMMA:

My Music
Music Business
CD BABY icon
COMMERCE icon
GoDaddy ICON
I keep forgetting to mention this, but as of last month, CD Baby is only distributing digital versions of albums and singles. They have stopped dealing with physical CDs.

Thus, at the moment, the only way to purchase a CD of my album or its singles is through me, personally. And, unfortunately, at this immediate moment that does not include any sort of on-line purchase unless you were to email me and we work out a transaction plan (payment, delivery, yadda yadda).

I'll be making myself familiar with how to do PayPal transactions as a short-term solution ‐‐ I do have an account. I'll also be soon finally setting up a commerce page here at the website. I need to first finally get the site verified and certified and made more secure. And I need to get with GoDaddy to get the commerce page set up. I'd like to get them to help me set up an email contact form, too. I've tried putting form code on a page several times and not been successful.

My big gripe about contacting GoDaddy is that I want to get help from a warm body, and it's damn near impossible, as far as my experience has been, to finally get past the help pages and chatbots to connect with an actual human being.

Nevertheless, the plan from the start of the move to the new domain service was to get the commerce page up and running, so it's past time for that to happen. This CD distribution issue has just been the impetus.


SOUND ENGINEERING; SOUND DESIGNING:

SOUND DESIGNING ICON
Young At Heart Players icon
Last Saturday I did some sound engineering processing and also programmed the sound cues into the Show Cue Systems software, for this weekend's Young at Heart Players' production of Women On Fire at The Guild. I'll be there for their tech rehearsal tomorrow night, too, just to help them get the sound op off the ground.

BRIGHT STAR at BCT icon
Last night I had a brief meeting with Director Jeff Sams about the sound design for the Beavercreek Community Theatre mounting of Bright Star, by Steve Martin & Edie Brickell. I'll start working on it a bit more earnestly in couple weeks. Truthfully, it's going to be a pretty easy show in terms of sound design.



Fri, Jul 14, 2023

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SAG-AFTRA On Strike - WGA On Strike - I Am In Solidarity
I am not yet a member of either of these unions. At the moment I'm just a lowly EMC. But I have friends and acquaintances who are members of at least one of the unions, and some of them, both. I wholly support their strike and their beefs about the wholesale bullshit that's being offered to them, especially the AI aspects that the studios want to shove down their throats. Plus, neither actors nor writers are getting fair compensation for streaming and downloads, and other formats. Even if I never can join either of these unions, (though I hope I do), I don't like seeing my friends get screwed.

MORE PREPRODUCTION:

WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
DTG Director icon
Script Analysis icon
Script analysis is continuing with, of course, the priority the last several days beng to choose the audition sides, so I could get those cuttings available on-line. The next priority for me right now is the production music, followed closely by other sound design considerations. But I've still been considering to some extent all of character study, lighting, costuming, and, last but not least, the scenic design.

AUDITION SIDES ICON
The audition sides for Wednesday's Child are now available, here. My attempt was to pick scenes, or portions of scenes, so that the culmination will explore the emotional range of each of the characters. In the end, I created eighteen sides. I then was going to scrutinize them and maybe trim the number down, but decided to not do that. Some of the sides are pretty short. In fact there's only one that is exceptionally long, but it employs all but one character. I simply want to give the actors the opportunity to show me the full range of the characters. I know I often am in auditions and think to myself that there were other places in the script that would have given the director a fuller sense of my and the other actor's ability to play the breadth of the character's emotional life. So, I picked eighteen cuttings. And, anyway, I believe I've been to an audition or two with more.

SOUND DESIGNING ICON
Musical Composition
As for sound design, as I wrote above, the big focus of recent has been making notes about what sort of production music should go into the show. More specifically, what should I be composing? My notes have thusfar stayed on the concept that many of the scene transition compositions should be bass guitar work, some with, some without the accompaniment of other instruments. There are also a few places where I am probably going to use some new-age-like music I created a few years back. I only have so far gotten through the end of Act 1, as I had to switch my main focus to the audition sides. The plan right now is to finish this task tomorrow, and perhaps even pull out the music equipment and begin some composing.

also
Though I don't want to go into detail at the moment, I will say that I am thinking about adding another sort of expert to the production staff. I just need to get a good referral for someone who's good at the particular service. I know a few people who will probably be able to steer me in the right direction.


Opening Today

Young at Heart Players presents WOMEN ON FIRE at The Dayton Theatre Guild.

www.youngatheartplayers.com.



Wed, Jul 19, 2023

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THE SPACE & THE SONICS ‐‐ (PLUS):

WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
DTG Director icon
Scenic Design icon
Late afternoon, yesterday, I met with our scenic designer, Red Newman, to share and coordinate ideas and concepts, and to begin plans for the design of the set.

We had a good meeting. Red brought in a great concept that I am very much on board with. It's kind of both not at all what I had in mind yet very much in line with what I had in mind. I'd explain that but then I'd have to give you spoilers about the set that I don't wanna.

There are still some things to work out, some specifics of Red's initial floor plan, some logistics for the staging of the show, as well some determination of such things as set pieces. But we have a bit of time to deliberate and negotiate these things.

SOUND DESIGNING ICON
My Music
Musical Composition
K.L. on Bass
Maybe I'm not done with the initial notations of what sound effects the show needs, and when I need production music, and at least to some extent the mood of that music (based on what scenes each piece falls between). If not, I'm close. I'll surely go back and reassess, but probably on the fly as I begin to actually compose and record the music. Disclosure: I have not moved off the concept of this transition music being pieces that feature the bass guitar, with little or no accompaniment.

However, I have decided to come out of Act 1 with a recording by another artist. I also have several options of music by other artists for the curtain call music. I was planning on composing and recording the curtain call music myself, and I suppose it's early enough that such is not completely off the table, but the choices I have right now by other artists are compelling.

The composition and recording of my music for the show has not started, yet. Though, maybe some composition has begun since I have heard bass line ideas in my head for various scene transitions. The actual process of pulling out the equipment and working directly on this task will soon start, perhaps before we get to the weekend.

Script Analysis icon
Meanwhile, more passes through the script for more text study are on-going, still taking all aspects of the production, from character analysis through all the different technical considerations, into account. This will be a major part of the rest of my summer. I intend to walk into the rehearsal process with a strong understanding and interpretation of St. Germain's text and that text's story, and I hope not understanding and interpretation that betrays St. Germain's text.

also
Further steps have been taken to bring in another person to briefly help behind the scenes. Again, I guess I'm "vague-blogging" as I don't want to go into the specifics of this aspect. I probably won't really delve very deep into commentary on this element until I get to the post-mortem stage of this experience, in late November.

AUDITION ICON
Already I've been contacted by a few women and am aware of a few others whom I know are auditioning or are considering auditioning. As of yet, however, I am not aware of any men, save for one. There are two good roles for men in this show. All the roles are ones that actors can sink their teeth into. For any Dayton-local, non-AEA male actors who might happen to be reading this, click on the link just below and check out the specs for Martin Merrit (late 30s-mid 40s) and Det. Walt Dixon (50s-mid 60s) ‐‐ and note that the specified age ranges are what the actors can credibly sell, not necessarily their real ages.


A DAYTON THEATRE WEEKEND:

Daytonys - Dayton theatre Hall of Fame
Dayton theatre Guild Murphy Awards
GENERAL THEATRE STUFF ICON

This coming weekend will be a weekend of theatre awards for me and the Dayton theatre community in general. This is especially true for those of us associated with DTG, as on Saturday we will have our annual smorgasbord gathering that features our in-house theatre awards, the Murphys. Then Sunday will be the annual banquet for the Dayton theatre community in general, the Daytony Awards and Dayton Theatre Hall of Fame inductions.

Obviously, I don't know who will be taking home any awards at either affair. However, the inductees into The Dayton Theatre Hall of Fame have been announced. One will be long-time Guild boardmember, Debra Kent. The other will be Marjorie Strader, who's been involved in quite a few Guild productions. Both of these women with whom I have worked a bit.

Debra is a local actress but she also is a local theatre director who usually directs one show at The Guild each season, also occasionally directs at Beavercreek Community Theatre, and has directed plays for the Dayton Playhouse's new play festival, FutureFest. She also has served as chairman for The Guild's play reading committee for several years. I believe that I have been the producer for all the shows Debra has directed at DTG.

Margie, too, acts, but, again, is more prominent in the theatre community as a director, also as a lighting designer. Margie has directed three shows at The Guild, and I have been AD for two of them ‐‐ The Unavoidable Disappearance of Tom Durnan and Women in Jeopardy. I was supposed to AD for her for her other show at DTG, This Random World, but I was cast in The Human Race's world-premier production of Banned from Baseball, by Patricia O'Hara, which kept me from being available for a big chunk of the rehearsal period for This Random World; otherwise I would have done it because I like working with Margie.

I'm happy to see both these women making it into the Hall of Fame.


POTENTIAL ON-SCREEN NON-PAYING GIG:

ACTING ICON
On Set icon
Though I don't know hardly any details, I have been made aware of an opportunity to work on an indy film, in Columbus at the end of the month. I've been referred to the producers who will contact me shortly. Again, I know almost nothing about the project except that it's no-budget movie, or at least, that there is no paycheck for my involvement. But, I'm still game, as long as it won't be marketed for profit. I'm not on board with working for free if the production is expecting a financial return.


ACTRESSES ON FIRE:

Young At Heart Players icon
In the audience icon
WOMEN ON FIRE, by Irene O'Garden'
As many of you may know, The Guild hosted Young at Heart Players as they presented their production of Women On Fire, by Irene O'Garden this past weekend. I was able to give them some consultation on running their sound design, as well as programming the sounds into Show Cue Systems, the software we use to run sound.

At the Sunday matinée, I attended as an audience member and found the performances quite entertaining.

Annie Pesch directed. Her cast was a collection of talented local women, (On Fire):
Gail Andrews Turner, Shanna Camacho, Becky Howard, Barbara Jorgensen, Jane McBride, Fran Pesch, Jackie Pfeifer, Kerry Simpson, and Gayle Smith.

The crew was: Brian Buttrey (stage manager), Richard Lee Waldeck (lighting designer), Annie (sound designer), Abby Williams (composer & performer of opening/closing themes), Emma Meyer (light board operator), and Michael Shannon (sound board operator). I was also given credit as "Sound Engineer."

Kudos to Young at Heart Players for their work!



Mon, Jul 24, 2023

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COMMENTARY ON "MEMORIES OF THE TIMES BEFORE":

My Music
On-Liner Notes
My likely overly-verbose On-Liner Notes commentary about the penultimate song on Virtually Approximate Subterfuge, "Memories of the Times Before (Pt. 1-4)," is now up on the site.

There's only one song left, the song I knew from the moment I realized I was making an album was going to close it, and almost was the title cut. After that, I may still have commentary on the album. Exactly what it will be, I can't say.

On-Liner Notes: "Memories of the Times Before (Pt. 1-4)".


THE STATE OF THREE GIGS:

ACTING ICON
The Human Race Theare Company icon
PROFESSIONAL GIG ICON
Street Theatre icon
The Dayton Art in the City festival Playwright Race, put on by the The Human Race is a confirmed go! We actors, directors, and playwrights will meet Friday evening, August 4 to team up and get the concepts for each teams ten-minute play. Then the teams will meet and discuss; then the playwright will pull an all nighter to write the script. We then meet Saturday morning to rehearse. Next, all teams gather together for "Show and Tell," with each team performing their play on The Loft stage. Then we'll all be off to hit the streets to do our plays several times in several locations during the Art in Dayton Festival.

If you're close by the Dayton area, you should come down and check the whole affair out!

?

On Set icon
FOR THE LOVE OF THE CRAFT ICON
AUDITION ICON
As of yet I have not heard from the producers of whatever is this project that has principal photography next weekend in Columbus. It's possible they have already met their needs.

I also haven't yet auditioned for the local web series I wrote of on July 11. I probably am going to follow through, though, again, as I wrote before, there may be scheduling conflicts.

THE DAYTON THEATRE HALL OF FAME & DAYTONY AWARDS:

Daytonys - Dayton theatre Hall of Fame
CONGRATULATIONS!
Here's to Debra Kent and Marjorie Strader, the two 2023 inductees into the Dayton Theatre Hall of Fame.

And here's to all those who took home a DayTony award last night.

CLICK HERE for the list of the award winners and pictures from the gala.


Fri, Jul 28, 2023

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READING, READING, READING:

WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
DTG Director icon
Script Analysis icon
The director has made more passes through the text doing script analysis. That still is entailing any aspect of the production that comes to mind as I read: character study, stage management, lighting, sound design, costuming, and still the scenic design, even though Red Newman has a strong concept already going.

SOUND DESIGNING ICON
Sound Effects icon
Preshow Music icon
Intermission Music icon
As alluded to above, the sound designer is still honing his concept of the production music, which, as you may know, will 99% be original music, the preshow music and intermission music, and any needed sound effects that I missed in any earlier passes through the script.

As for preshow and intermission music, as well as candidates for the curtain call music, I have thought of a couple more recording artists that are right in the wheel-well of what I'm looking for. For this show, all the vocalized music, preshow, intermission, or production, will be by female artists.

I've already chosen the song that is taking us out of Act 1 and into intermission ‐‐ it's a cover of a song that is quite appropriate for that spot, but the original recording has a male vocalist. I was able to find a good cover with a female vocalist.

Already, I have several female artists to choose from for all this music, and now I have a couple more names to add. Tomorrow I'm going on an expedition to get recordings for both this show and for Bright Star , for which, of course, I'm also the sound designer. It's sort of but really not multitasking.


BRIGHT SOUND IN THE WORKS:

BRIGHT STAR at BCT icon
SOUND DESIGNING ICON
Audio Hardware icon
Wednesday night I dropped by the Bright Star rehearsal to check a few things out. I needed to scope out channel assignments for the Lavalier mics, as well as other channel assignments, and what channels might be free. I also needed to do some inventory of what equipment is there and where it's at. Plus, I needed to see where the orchestra will be and where back stage that back-stage singers might be placed. I got most of my answers.

Preshow Music icon
Intermission Music icon
Though I haven't officially began to curate the preshow and intermission, I do have a really good idea of what I'm going to do for both. Gathering the music together is on my agenda for tomorrow.


NEW CONCEPTS & OVER-DUE COMPLETIONS:

My Music
Songwriter icon
Though I have no immediate plans for a major project of new music, save for the production music for Wednesday's Child, I have had a couple ideas for new songs come to me recently. Both are pretty bare-boned at the moment, one, really more of a concept with nothing but the title and a strategy for writing the lyrics, but with only a vague idea for music, even for genre. The other song idea is only a stanza and a half of lyrics, with no current concept of the music.

I still have a whole, thirty-something-year-old album to mix and master ‐‐ plus adding a bass line to one of its songs (or maybe to more songs).


PLAYWRIGHT WORK ‐‐ IS THERE A FULL-OUT REWRITE IN THE FUTURE? MAYBE, MAYBE NOT:

The Writer icon
Final Draft 12 icon
I'm flirting with the idea of restructuring how I tell the story in my play manuscript. I'm talking a fairly big rewrite. I would not change the story but if I succumb to this flirtation the structure would definitely change greatly.

It's a thought, but not one I am sold on. I have some reluctance; it's fair to say I have resistance to this idea. Yet, it has occurred to me, so I'm not dismissing it out of hand.

The thing is, there is a challenge to revising the play with the structure it has to get it to the place where it tells the story well. It is, however, written right now in a way that some find difficult or unappealing. There are going to be some readers and/or audience members who aren't going care for it in its current structure. So what? Pleasing everyone, even every‐thoughtful‐one means compromising down to mediocrity, and FUCK that!

And I can name people who will not care for the play in its current structure. There's a lot of memory dialogue, exposition. But it's really as much exposition for the characters as it for the audience; in fact, it's more so for the characters. It's these people finally learning things; it's really the point of the story, these characters' discoveries about each other, especially two of them.

I could write flashback scenes, but most all of the memories are from when they are all much younger, and that would entail either double casting each character with a younger and older actor, or have the adult actors take on the personas of the child versions. I don't want to do either. Plus it would mean that there would need to be other characters cast, and I don't want that, either.

There is a less extensive rewrite, almost more of a revision border-lining on a rewrite, that I probably am going to do. It keeps the current concept and structure, adds or removes no information, but pumps up the conflict in the early part of the play.

Another thing that I know many people will have a problem with is that there are a lot of off-stage characters, and some people simply don't like that, especially the number that are in my play. I have already gotten such feedback. That's just too bad. I don't have such a problem when off-stage characters are in a play I see, and I don't have a problem putting them in mine.

So, this flirtation with restructuring the play is likely to stay a flirtation and never make it to an affair. But, it's not totally dismissed as of yet.

Of course, when I get around to sitting down and opening up Final Draft to make any changes is another question.



Sun, Jul 30, 2023

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STREET THEATRE IN DAYTON ‐‐ (That YOU Can Help With):

ACTING ICON
The Human Race Theare Company icon
PROFESSIONAL GIG ICON
Street Theatre icon
ARt in the City 2023 banner

Just a reminder about the Dayton Art in the City festival Playwright Race, put on by the The Human Race is this coming Saturday afternoon in Downtown Dayton, and that I'm one of the players.

We actors, directors, and playwrights will meet this Friday evening to team up and get the concepts for each teams ten-minute play. Then the teams will meet and discuss; then the playwright will pull an all nighter to write the script. We then meet Saturday morning to rehearse. Next, all teams gather together for "Show and Tell," with each team performing their play on The Loft stage. Then we'll all be off to hit the streets to do our plays several times in several locations during the Art in Dayton Festival.



Fri, Aug 4, 2023

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THE PLAYWRIGHT RACE HAPPENS TOMORROW AFTERNOON:

Art in the City 2023 icon
The Human Race Theare Company icon
Street Theatre icon
ACTING ICON
PROFESSIONAL GIG ICON
The Dayton Art in the City Festival Playwright Race, put on by the The Human Race Theatre Company is tomorrow afternoon. The playwrights, directors, PAs, and we actors will meet this evening at The Loft Theatre to get our teams assigned and find out what scenarios for each of our ten-minute plays will be. Although I understand that they may be more like five-minute plays. I can't remember how long the one I was in last year was, but it seems it was closer to ten.

This is a fun street theatre event. All my co-conspirators and I had a blast at last year's Art in the City and I expect it will be the same this year. To be honest, there were times when we didn't catch people's attentions because there were other things happening close by, such as a concert at the Levitt Pavilion, or there otherwise was a lot of street noise to compete with. But, when we did capture attention, our audiences clearly enjoyed the performances. I think the gamble is part of the thrill: Will this next one come off? Will it be a good location? Will anyone care what we're doing? Sounds abusive, but, hey, I've done a reader's theatre performance to a barely interested audience of one; once we did a whole script to an empty room (in case someone did wander in); and I've done several to very small audiences (3-6). Still liked the experience, believe it or not. It's like a badge or a medal that you earn as an actor.

But, tomorrow, we are going to WOW at least some of those folk on the street, at least at a few of our stops, by gosh!


PREPRODUCTION SLOGS ONWARD:

WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
DTG Director icon
Script Analysis icon
I'm still cycling through passes of the text doing script study as Mr. Director Boy, and still looking at all aspects of production and making relevant notes as I go.

SOUND DESIGNING ICON
Production Music icon
Preshow Music icon
Intermission Music icon
My recent attempt to procure some music by specific artists for preshow, intermission, and, potentially, production music was not as successful as I'd hoped. I tried a local public library, which had no music by any of the artists I was specifically looking for. I did grab one CD by an artist I hadn't thought of. Her music may make it into preshow or intermission, but nothing on that album will work as the curtain call music, so nothing will make that list of choices. And, of course, I have now thought of another obvious female artist that for some reason ad not already occurred to me.

Meanwhile, though I have not yet sat down to compose or record any of the original production music, I have made quite a few more notes about mood and tone of specific music in specific spots.


BRIGHT SOUND WORK CONTINUES:

BRIGHT STAR at BCT icon
SOUND DESIGNING ICON
Preshow Music icon
Intermission Music icon
Sound Effects icon

The curation of music for preshow and intermission has begun; though I may not need music for preshow as there may be a chance that the production orchestra (i.e.: band) will be playing it live. I'll get a confirmation one way or the other shortly.

Meanwhile I have a relatively comprehensive list of the needed sound effects and where they go in the script. Unless I'm mistaken, I have everything in my SFX library already ‐‐ though I am contemplating doing some Foley work for one particular ambient sound need. I can do it right from my patio at home.



Sat, Aug 5, 2023

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TODAY FOR ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY

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Okay, technically more than only One Performance, still only One Performance Day

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The Dayton Art in the City Festival is happening this afternoon in Downton Dayton. And, if you didn't already know, The Human Race Theatre Company is producing some street theatre in the manner of a Playwright Race, as they did ast year. And, like last year, I will be one of the players.

We all met last evening at The Loft Theatre, the playwrights, the directors, the PAs, and we actors, to get our teams assigned and our scenarios for each of our short play ‐‐ (I've been referring to them as ten-minute plays, but they really will be "five"-minute plays). I am, by-the-way, part of Team 5.

I won't give any substantive info about the story prompt for the short play ur team will be doing. Frankly, I haven't seen the script yet, I won't until later this morning after I've arrived at The Race for rehearsal. But, I do know the basic premise; now to see what our playwright, Jill Summerville, does with the concept. Our team's director, by-the-way, is Matthew Smith. Steven Mongelli is our PA. My fellow actors on Team 5 are Jamie Cordes and Addi Helms.

Here is the schedule/locations of our performances:

  • 3:00 Dayton Arcade (4th St entrance)
  • 3:45 Courthouse Square (steps)
  • 4:30 PNC Arts Annex (front)
  • 5:15 Dayton Metro Library (3rd St entrance)
  • 6:00 Oregon District Arch (on Pine St)
  • *Each team will rotate at being the first up. Team 5 begins in the last position (fifth), then moves up to fourth, and etc., etc., to be #1 for the 6:00 performances.


    WHAT'RE YOU DOING THE DAY AFTER LABOR DAY?:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    AUDITION ICON

    We are one calendar month away from auditions for Wednesday's Child, by Mark St. Germain.

    They are Tue & Wed, Sep 5 & 6.



    Mon, Aug 7, 2023

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    ANOTHER GREAT DAY PLAYING ON THE STREET:

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    Me, Jamie Cordes, & Addi Helms performing at the Playwright Race Show‐&‐Tell at The Human Race Theatre Company on Saturday afternoon before we headed to the festival for our street performances.
    ‐‐ Photo credit: Human Race Theatre Co.
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    POST-MORTEM
    The Human Race Theare Company icon
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    A little pseudo-post mortem seems due about the The Human Race Theatre Company's Playwright Race, that was part of this past Saturday's Dayton Art in the City Festival.

    Some of you reading this already know that Friday evening the playwrights, the directors, the PAs, and we actors, met at The Loft Theatre to assign actors to one of the five teams and for each playwright to get their prompt ideas for their scripts. The players and prompts were picked by lottery. The results were the following five teams and their five-minute, pop-up plays:

      Team 1: "Did You Read It?" (from the prompt of the novel Lessons in Chemestry and one other novel title that I can't recall) ‐‐
      Kelsey Celek (Playwright), Christine Brunner (Director), Gale Krakorka (PA), Andrew Ian Adams (Actor), Bryana Bentley (Actor), & Shaun Diggs (Actor)

      Team 2: "A Midsummer Night's Silliness" (obviously based on the prompt of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream) ‐‐
      Christine Duncan (Playwright), Tim Lile (Director), Becky Howard (PA), Erin Butcher (Actor), Jason Podplesky (Actor) & Robb Willoughby (Actor)

      Team 3: "A Rock and a Hard Place" (based on the prompt of the folktale The Stone Cutter) ‐‐
      Chris Leyva (Playwright), Annie Pesch (Director), Brian Buttrey (PA), Rico Parker (Actor), Fran Pesch (Actor) & Libby Scancarello (Actor)

      Team 4: (untitled) (based on the prompts of Greek mythology & Agamemnon) ‐‐
      Jake Lockwood (Playwright), Saul Caplan (Director), Sarah Caplan (PA), Emma Alexander (Actor), Kiersten Farmer (Actor) & Marva Williams-Parker (Actor)

      Team 5: "Covered in Dirt" (Based on the prompt of the novel Sense and Sensibility) ‐‐
      Jill Summerville (Playwright), Matthew Smith (Director), Steven Mongelli (PA), Jamie Cordes (Actor), Addi Helms (Actor), & K.L.Storer (Actor)

      *Who the f___ is that last dude in Team 5?

    Our Team 5 playwright, Jill Summerville, was one of two who had to work the weekend remotely; the other being Jake Lockwood (Team 4), who is in Florida. Jill is in the area but could not attend in person. She and our director, Matthew Smith were in contact via phone calls and texts during the whole process.

    Addi was cast as Elizabeth (Lizzie) Bennet, Jaime as George Wickham, and I as William Darcey, all from the novel. Of course, the take of our play was a send up and the big twist was that the wildness of William's character was represented him being a werewolf. Yep, I spent a good portion of the five-minute play as a werewolf. The idea was put across to the audiences by my voice, my physicality, and a pair of wolf ears I was provided, those being the only costuming or prop in our presentation. It was a fun little script to put on and I had a lot fun playing with Ms. Helms and with Jaime, the latter whom I have worked with once before, back in 2013, in Michale Slade's Gingerbread Children at the Human Race. In fact, our director, Matthew Smith was also in that cast.

    Yes, our performances were a lot of fun, both performing our Team 5 play and witnessing the four other plays. But there are some challenges to street theatre. The biggest challenge, especially during an outdoor festival is competing noises. That can mean other festival events such as bands performing close-by to the spot where your troupe has been assigned to be. In urban locations, where most street theatre takes place, there's also traffic: loud engines like motorcycles, police or ambulance sirens, yadda yadda. Sometimes there's also a quite compelling event somewhere near, happening at the same time and drawing the festival attendees' attention. We had all of these issues at one point or another yesterday, along with there just being so much congestion at one spot where we were supposed to be that we had to slightly alter our location from the assigned one. The weather can also be an obstacle, either rain or heat and humidity, even strong wind. But it's all part of the game of performing on the street. Saturday the weather wasn't too awful. It was a bit hot at times, but last year it was hotter and quite humid with practically no breeze. We also got rain last year for a little bit, but just long enough to aggravate the humidity. Last Saturday's weather was much kinder, in the end.

    My big personal issue was that I did not either do proper vocal warm-ups nor proper physical warm-ups. More to the point, I didn't do any of either, and I paid for it. My William/werewolf spent most of the five minutes using a gruff, gravely voice, and one big ol' howl, and I did a bit of a physical workout. Mind you, the physicality wasn't horribly demanding, but for this sixty-something, slightly out-of-shape dude who did not stretch or otherwise warm his body up ahead of time, it was demanding to a certain extent. My voice was not sufficiently warmed up, either. I ended the day with sore legs, a sore lower back, and a sore throat. All of it was preventable had I done my warm-ups as I should have. No regrets though. I still had a blast and the audiences seems to enjoy us all.

    The Race plans to do the Playwright Race at next year's Art in the City Festival, and if they again approach me and my schedule allows, I'll be there!

    It's possible that I will be adding more photos from the event, here, at later dates, as I become aware of them and am able to grab them and post them.
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    My team, Team 5: Steven Mongelli (PA), Matthew Smith (Director), me (Actor), Addi Helms (Actor), & Jamie Cordes (Actor); not pictured‐ Jill Summerville (Playwright)
    ‐‐ Photo credit: Human Race Theatre Co.
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    Our team in Friday night discussion of our prompt idea
    ‐‐ Photo credit: Human Race Theatre Co.
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    Rehearsing Saturday morning; Addi & I, with Steven & Jaime in the foreground
    ‐‐ Photo credit: Human Race Theatre Co.
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    Our theatre version of craft service during the Saturday morning rehearsal period.
    ‐‐ Photo credit for 1-3: Human Race Theatre Co.
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    The Human Race staff active in the Playwright Race: Tara Lail (Creative Producer), Tiffany Countryman (Engagement & Learning Coordinator), & Emily N. Wells (Artistic Director)
    ‐‐ Photo credit: Human Race Theatre Co.
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    Our Team 5 director, Matthew Smith, announcing us at the Show‐&‐Tell.
    ‐‐ Photo credit: Human Race Theatre Co.
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    Me & Addi performing at Court House Square
    ‐‐ Photo credit: Ken Harnish
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    Still me & Addi at Court House Square, with Jamie joining us in the last photo
    ‐‐ Photo credit for 1-3: Ken Harnish
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    Team 1: Shaun Diggs (Actor), Kelsey Celek (Playwright), Christine Brunner (Director), Bryana Bentley (Actor), Andrew Ian Adams (Actor), & Gale Krakorka (PA)
    ‐‐ Photo credit: Human Race Theatre Co.
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    Team 2: Becky Howard (PA), Tim Lile (Director), Robb Willoughby(Actor), Christine Duncan (Playwright), Erin Butcher (Actor), & Jason Podplesky (Actor)
    ‐‐ Photo credit: Human Race Theatre Co.
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    Team 3: Libby Scancarello (Actor), Fran Pesch (Actor), Chris Leyva (Playwright), Annie Pesch (director), Rico Parker (Actor), & Brian Buttrey (PA)
    ‐‐ Photo credit: Human Race Theatre Co.
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    Team 4: Kiersten Farmer (Actor), Emma Alexander (Actor), Marva Williams-Parker (Actor), Saul Caplan (Director), Sarah Caplan (PA); not pictured‐ Jake Lockwood (Playwright)
    ‐‐ Photo credit: Human Race Theatre Co.
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    Saul Caplan introducing his Team 4 at the Show‐&‐Tell
    ‐‐ Photo credit: Human Race Theatre Co.
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    Andrew, Bryana, & Shaun during Team 1 rehearsal
    ‐‐ Photo credit: Kelsey Celek
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    Robb, Erin, & Jason (Team 2), first performing at the Show‐&‐Tell, then at Court House Square.
    ‐‐ Photo credit for 1: Human Race Theatre Company; 2-3: Ken Harnish



    Wed, Aug 9, 2023

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    ANOTHER USEFUL, PRACTICAL TOY, IF NOT BOUGHT AT A PRACTICAL TIME:

    My Music
    K.L. on Bass
    Tools of the Trade icon
    Impulse Buy icon
    photo of a blue Boss CEB-3 Bass Chorus Pedal

    It's not like I comfortably have the cashflow right now to do it. Nevertheless, yesterday at lunch at the rent-payer, I ordered a Boss CEB-3 Bass Chorus Pedal, along with an AC power adapter for it, from Sweetwater. Recently I read something in a facebook bass players group I belong to about how handy this pedal is.

    It's been a while since I've bought something to add to my bass work, hell, for my music in general. While reading the post about the Chorus pedal, all I could think is how it would be most effective in some of the scene-transition production music I'll soon be composing and recording for Mark St. Germain's Wednesday's Child at the Dayton Theatre Guild. You know, the one I'm directing? It'll be most effective after that, too.

    The Boss pedal, with Boss being a brand I like, was more affordable than some of the other choices. It still was a little more than I'd wished before I got to the site. I have to admit, though, I wasn't shocked at the number: $129.99 ‐‐ "was $157.99!". I have no doubt the other brands are good pedals, too, but the CEB-3 was more in my price range, with the whole purchase, pedal, power adaptor, and sales tax, still coming in under $200.

    The little dilemma, really quite little, is that it's going to arrive at my work place no earlier than tomorrow, probably on Friday. I will not be there until next Wednesday, and won't be able to drop by. I will not have it in hand until I return to work next Wednesday. Another quandary is that now I am thinking that I really need to get a preamp pedal. A preamp bass pedal is going to run in the neighborhood of $250-$300‐plus. So, not something that I'll be getting in the near future. I actually have an old analogue preamp, from last century, that needs some repair, repair that I'd planned on doing back in 2020 during the depths of the pandemic shutdown, but didn't. I still could make the repairs, but, I am more interested in a newer digital preamp.



    Wed, Aug 16, 2023

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    MULTIPLE-INTERRUPTUS:

    VACATION
    STAYCATION
    Camping
    Kayaking icon
    HIKING ICON
    No The Writer icon
    Voice Acting icon
    No My Music
    photo of a flat computer screen with the words "I'm in vacation," overimages of a wooded trail, a camping skillet with food cooking in it, K.L. tending to a fire pit, and a camping tent.
    What's been on my computer screen at the rent-payer whilst I've been out of the office.
    Last Thursday, I went on vacation to Cowan Lake for five nights/six days of camping. I was quite looking forward to the trip, despite that there was rain predicted at a higher probability on some days.

    The plan was to do some kayaking at least once if not a couple times. I also had a bit of an artist's retreat planned, where I would work on the revision if not at least partial rewrite of my play manuscript. I also brought my Wednesday's Child script for potential script study. Having brought my laptop there was the chance of some work on the sound design for Bright Star (opening soon at Beavercreek Community Theatre). though these things didn't happen. Of course, hiking and fire pits were part of the equation, too.

    For a lot of what was palnned, this ended up being the vacation of things interrupted. First, Friday, I did go kayaking, wanting to be on the lake for about four hours. I didn't make the two hours that is the minimum rental charge for the kayak, however. At about 90 minutes in, while trying to take a photo with my iPhone, it stopped functioning at all. It was quite wet from the kayaking adventure. I went back to shore to dry it out, with the hope that it would return to working. It did, by the way. Having eaten a bit of the rental fee, I went back to camp, ate lunch, then took a hike on the trail that was close to camp.

    The second thing interrupted, was ultimately the entire trip to Cowan Lake. Friday night I went into Wilmington to get ice for my cooler. The next morning I could not find my wallet anywhere in my tent or car. I drove to the Speedway where I brought the ice the night before and no one had turned one in. I did a hail Mary search outside the store to, of course, no avail.

    When I got back to camp, I got on the phone and cancelled my credit cards and then put a freeze on my credit. Having no cash on me for further ice or firewood*, or anything else, and no immediate spending power ‐‐ I had my checkbook, but no ID, staying at the park wasn't looking good.

    *) For the record, I had purchased 80 pieces of firewood for my fire pits, more than a week prior to the trip, from the same farmer I have been for several years. But could not get any of the pieces to catch fire well, and I ended up buying a couple bundles for Friday night's fire pit from the park. And I knew I would have to do the same for the rest of the fire pits on the trip. This is not the first time I've had trouble getting his wood to burn, but I've always managed to FINALLY get it started. This time: no. So, I've decided that the 50¢ per piece of wood isn't a good enough draw for me. From now on I budget to spend a bit more for my fire wood for camping and cabin vacations.

    Yep, my vacation evolved into a staycation. I went home for the rest of my days off. On the way home, I stopped at my sister's to write her a check for some cash to get me through until my new cards arrive (no ID needed for Sis). Then I started laying plans to replace my driver's license, and various other credentials and cards that were in my wallet. I was not looking forward to the hassle of the next few weeks.

    However, when I got home to my apartment there was a business card from a local police officer asking me to call "about a missing wallet." Someone in Wilmington had turned it in to the Wilmington Police. I had to drive back 45 minutes one-way to retrieve it, but, you know what? that was a small price to pay in time and gas to get my credentials back. I may have already cancelled my credit cards, but at least dealing with the BMV, Social Security, the insurance companies, AAA, etc., in terms of card replacements was no longer going to be necessary.

    I just wish I knew who it was that turned it in. I'd send them a reward.

    For a couple reasons, I elected not to go back and re-make my camp, though I had the lot until Tuesday at 1:00. Some of it had to do with not really feeling like pitching the tent and setting up camp again. But also there were things I could attend to during the new staycation phase that I would have had to rush at when I got home Tuesday afternoon from camping. My ambitions were not completely realized, but I recorded a bit of voice acting for DTG's upcoming run of August Wilson's Radio Golf, which I would have had to rush to get to the show's sound designer, Sarah Saunders in time for her to easily work it into her design. I never did do any work on my play manuscript, nor anything for Bright Star, though I did conduct a bit of administrative business for Wednesday's Child, via email, while I was still at Cowan Lake.

    As well, the Boss CEB-3 Bass Chorus Pedal which I ordered from Sweetwater was delivered to the rent-payer Thursday while I was on my way to the lake. I dropped by the office on Subday and picked it up. Naturally, my goal was to plug that baby in during staycation time and play around a bit. Didn't happen. But you can bet it will happen soon!

    I decided to end my vacation days off with at least one more recreational-type event. So, yesterday I went to The Columbus Zoo. I hadn't been there since before the COVID lockdown; in fact, it's been five years. This was another thing that was interrupted, though not too badly. The chance of rain was forecasted, and while I was there there were times when it was lightly showering. But it started to rain heavier so I cut my day short by about and hour or two. Still, it was a nice day.

    So, this was not the vacation I had planned, but it could have been worse.



    Thu, Aug 17, 2023

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    TRYING OUT THE NEW TOOL/(TOY?):

    My Music
    K.L. on Bass
    Boss CEB-3 Bass Chorus icon

    Last night, after a couple day's wait, I finally gave my new Boss CEB-3 Bass Chorus Pedal its first test run. I tried out a few musical ideas I've had for the production music for Wednesday's Child. Mostly though I was just getting to know the pedal a little bit. I still have a bit more experimenting to do before action starts happening.

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    Last night, playing around with the Chorus pedal, daisy-chained in with my other pedals, which I sometimes employed along with the new one in various combinations.

    BRIGHT SOUND ATTENTION:

    BRIGHT STAR at BCT icon
    SOUND DESIGNING ICON
    Before playing with my new toy last night, I dropped into BCT during the Bright Star rehearsal. The team was working Act 1; I had thought it would be a straight run. I ended up not staying very long, but I knew that the musical director, Lorri Topping, had some technical questions for me. I still have to find out the answer to several of them. If you've been here before you are aware that I don't know the BCT sound system set-up terribly well, and I almost know nothing about their mixing board. But these are questions that need to be answered ‐‐ and I can't believe that one of them hadn't already occurred to me


    SLIGHT BUT IMPORTANT CHANGE TO THE SITE:

    KLStorer.com
    Image of the website url for klstorer.com showing it as a secure site

    It's been a little longer coming than I'd hoped, but klstorer.com is now SSL secured. This means I may start doing some attempted commerce at the site.



    Wed, Aug 23, 2023

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    JUST AROUND THE CORNER!:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    AUDITION ICON
    Well, the auditions for Wednesday's Child (by Mark St. Germain) are coming up; they're just a short thirteen days away. I'm anxious to get back to script study, which has had to take a back seat while I concentrated on the soundwork for Bright Star, opening Sep 1 at Beavercreek Community Theatre. I want to get back to script analysis for auditions and because rehearsals begin in less than three weeks, and I'd rather have had more time and effort put into scrutinizing the text than I've had these last few weeks.

    Scenic Design icon
    Lighting Designing icon
    Props icon
    I've met with the scenic designer, Red Newman, a couple times, and we both just met with the lighting designer, Marjorie Starder, along with the show's producer, Scott Madden. The set is still not carved in stone, but the concept is pretty much formed. Scott and I also discussed a couple specific prop needs as well as having found our prop manager, who happened to be at the theatre working on the current show. So, Sarah Saunders, who will also be our sound technician, is on board for props.


    AT THE CORNER:

    AUGUST WILSON'S RADIO GOLF, by August Wilson at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Promotional trailer icon
    Monday night I was on hand at the tech rehearsal for August Wilson's Radio Golf to shoot the footage for the promotional trailer. I didn't stay for the whole run, just long enough to get enough interesting movement from all the cast members. I wasn't able to secure permission to use dialogue in the trailer, so mos footage has to suffice for this one. Though I didn't see a whole lot of the rehearsal, I can tell you that the actors are doing an excellent job and this one will be well worth seeing. DTG is definitely opening 2023/2024 strongly.

    The trailer, by-the-way, is at final cut and posted on-line. Click here to see it.


    JUST PAST THE CORNER:

    BRIGHT STAR at BCT icon
    SOUND DESIGNING ICON
    Sunday evening I attended the sitzprobe for Bright Star. Beyond being impressed with the band ‐‐ and the singers ‐‐ I also had a few questions arise concerning sound design. The questions that arose for me are not regarding SFX but rather microphone issues. Without going into detail I have what may be an unfounded concern that will either be verified or invalidated sometime soon.

    Meanwhile I have harvested, and some cases, built, sound effects for the show. I've also curated and processed most of the intermission music; I still may add just a few more songs to the play list.

    As of yet I haven't began to program the cues in Show Cue Systems; that may begin tonight. Tech Sunday is this weekend, and Opening Night is Sep. 1.



    Thu, Aug 25, 2023

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    Opening Today

    AUGUST WILSON'S RADIO GOLF, by August Wilson's at The Dayton Theatre Guild.

    Click here for the promotional trailer of the show



    Mon, Aug 28, 2023

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    TECH WEEK IS ON THE RUNWAY:

    BRIGHT STAR at BCT icon
    SOUND DESIGNING ICON
    The Bright Star, BCT company kicked off Tech Week, yesterday, with Tech Sunday. I had come in on Saturday and spent a good portion of the day at the theatre, programming and implementing the SFX, as well as other sound-related stuff. We also had an early dry tech yesterday, before the cast arrived. So, I again, spent a good part of the day at the theatre.

    Not all tech elements were incorporated yesterday, but will be tonight. There are still some questions about exactly what mics need to be on during certain songs. My hope is that I flush that out at tonight's rehearsal.

    The show opens this Friday.


    SHOW SEEMS TO BE OFF TO A GREAT START:

    AUGUST WILSON'S RADIO GOLF, by August Wilson at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    I was one of the house managers Friday evening, so I didn't really attend to the performance, as is the usual case. But the response from the audience was tremendously positive. And even though it is a two-hour-forty minute show, a quite large portion of that Opening Night audience stayed for the Opening Night Gala, and not just for a few minutes. Most of them stayed for 45 minutes to an hour. This is a strong indicator of a high audience approval for the show.

    ON "TEMPORARY" HOLD, ONLY:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    No Report

    No progress toward Wednesday's Child has been made. I do have a meeting scheduled this week with my stage manager. As soon as Bright Star is on its legs, I'll be focusing on this one.



    Fri, Sep 1, 2023

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    THE OPEN AUDITIONS ARE JUST FOUR DAYS AWAY!:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    Now that my involvement with Bright Star, at BCT, is winding down, I'm switching from the sound designer's hat to the director's and turning much more of my attention to Mark St. Germain's Wednesday's Child. Soon it'll all be there!

    I had a brief sit-down with Doug Patten, the Wednesday's Child production stage manager to get him up-to-speed on a few things from some recent production meetings he had to miss due to conflicts; and, we otherwise got on the same page in general.

    AUDITION ICON
    And, of course, auditions are this coming Tuesday and Wednesday, at 7:00 both nights at the theatre. I'm in the process of prepping all the documents, etc., for Tuesday. I still am only aware of a few men who are planning to audition, far less than the women I am aware of. But, I have myself, as an actor, for whatever reason, not told (or, maybe, not "warned") the director of my plans to audition, and I think some actors simply never announce their intentions. So I'm hoping I have some good choices to choose from from all genders.

    Script Analysis icon
    Otherwise, a big portion of this long weekend will be dedicated to me getting back to the script study that had to be put on a back-burner while I dealt with Bright Star. First off, I just want to dig even deeper into the story and the characters. There are also still some production decisions I need to make, in one case, our costume designer, Barb Jorgensen, has some questions I need to answer. And there are light transitions I need to consider to consult about with our lighting designer, Marjorie Strader ‐‐ the recent Dayton Theatre Hall of Fame inductee, Marjorie Strader. There's other production minutia to ponder as I re-read the script. So, it's getting several reads this weekend.


    Opening Today       BUT, SOLD OUT TONIGHT!

    BRIGHT STAR at BCT icon
    SOUND DESIGNING ICON
    Well, tonight Bright Star, by Steve Martin & Edie Brickell opens at the Beavercreek Community Theatre. But, like the headline above says, tonight's performance is sold out. My understanding is that the rest of this weekend is getting close to such.

    I know there's probably a tinge of bias here, since I am part of the production team, but I believe I am righteous in declaring this a really excellent production. It starts off with strong material; Martin and Brickell's book, lyrics and music are top notch. Jeff Sams' direction is also strong, as are the performances of the cast in general. And some performances are just down-right excellent. Add on the beautiful set and lighting and costuming, etc. and then finish it off with great choreography and an impressive pit band, and you got yerself a good time at the theatre.

    Seriously, if you are close enough to Dayton, I highly recommend you check this out: TICKETS.



    LABOR DAY, 2023

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    Labor Day: In Honor of the Workers Who Make the World Go Round


    THE OPEN AUDITIONS ARE TOMORROW & WEDNESDAY!:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    AUDITION ICON
    The open auditions for Mark St. Germain's Wednesday's Child are upon us tomorrow. With the exception of one organizational document, the director has his material ready. In other terms, such as psyche and emotion, he's pumped and ready; and, of course, as all directors do, hopes for a good turn out of strong candidates for the cast. He does know of a few good contenders for the roles, but is hoping for some real competition, despite that it will make his casting decisions harder.


    Tue, Sep 5, 2023

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    THE OPEN AUDITIONS ARE HERE!:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    AUDITION ICON

    GAME ON! icon



    Tonight we host Night One of open auditions for Mark St. Germain's Wednesday's Child. Tomorrow, about 9:00 pm, or so, we will wrap it up, then I will be charged with casting these seven juicy roles for actors to sink their teeth into. Though I don't know all of who will be standing in front of me tonight and tomorrow night, I do know several, and I also know that at last to some extent, the competition will put me in a position to not cast some talented people. That's a bitter-sweet proposition, sweet because of the strong choices; bitter because I can't choose all the good ones. But, it comes with the territory.

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    On my apartment patio, Sunday, doing some script study in (at?) that unbearable home office to which I often am forced to subject myself.
    A big stack of audition documents, which includes copies of the sides and audition applications tailored for this show.



    Wed, Sep 6, 2023

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    THE OPEN AUDITIONS, IN PROGRESS:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    AUDITION ICON

    GAME ON! icon



    Tonight is Night Two of open auditions for Mark St. Germain's Wednesday's Child. Last night we had a really good turnout of actors: four men and SIXTEEN women. As the result, no one was read a considerable amount of times. I encouraged them all to come back tonight, so they could be read at least a few more times. I do know of a few more actors whom are 99% probable to be there this evening, and a few others who were at least thinking about it the last I heard. There will be some new faces to read first. I can tell you that if no one new shows up I could cast the show, and that a few actors have definitely set the bar for the roles for which I am considering them. But we'll see what tonight brings us.

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    The different audition documents, spread out before the audition, waiting for use. First, the audition forms in the lobby, then the sides in the theatre, and lastly, my paperwork for use as I audition the actors.



    Thu, Sep 7, 2023

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    Today would have been my father's one-hundred-fourth birthday.

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY DAD
    My Dad, George Storer, at my college graduation, 1994
    George A. Storer
    1919-1995


    WE HAVE A CAST!:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    All totaled, we had twenty-four actors audition for the show, a fact that thrills me to tears. As I wrote in my email to the seventeen that I did not cast: I was put "in a bitter-sweet predicament. Sweet: because I had a lot of great options. Bitter: because I have to not cast actors absolutely worth casting. But there were 24 of you for 7 roles."

    Here's our cast list:
    The Cast of WEDNESDAY'S CHILD
    (in order of appearance/speaking)

    CHARACTER
          ACTOR
    Becca Connor
          Kayleen Nordyke

    Det. Aleece Valez
          Ghiovanna Dennis

    Susan Merrit
          Stephanie Henry

    Det. Walt Dixon
          Jamie McQuinn

    Molly Strutt
          Becky Howard

    Martin Merrit
          Ryan Hester

    Dr. Samantha Sutton
          Heather Atkinson

    I'm also most pleased that there are five actors on this list who are new to Guild productions, though, technically, Becky Howard was recently on our stage, but in the guest production by Young at Heart Players of Women On Fire, by Irene O'Garden. It also pleases me that three of these actors are brand new faces to me.

    I got me a good cast, and as I told one of the production team, earlier today, if some of the actors who were cast had not been there, I could have cast somene else and the calibre of the cast would yet be the same.



    Fri, Sep 8, 2023

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    MOVING INTO REHEARSALS:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    In REHEARSAL icon
    So we have our table read for Wednesday's Child, this coming Monday, with additional production business being conducted, such as some measurements and fittings with our costume designer, Barb Jorgensen, and various and a sundry business that our producer, Scott Madden, will attend to (bio and headshot deadlines, various publicity business, etc.).

    Meanwhile, last night I began the process of scheduling the blocking rehearsals. My plan is to schedule in such a way that not all actors are called every night, so that at least during the first couple weeks of rehearsals all the actors have more free week nights than later when we will be doing rehearsal runs four nights a week and will need everybody.

    This means that we'll be blocking the scenes out of sequence, which for this process is not a problem. I'm also shooting for these blocking rehearsals to be a little shorter, to get people out a little earlier. When we get to full runs of the show, the nights are going to end a little later, so a lighter schedule, early on, will be good for the cast as well as myself and PSM Doug Patten ‐‐ although Doug and I don't get the luxury of a rehearsal off like cast members will during the early weeks.

    My deadline to have this schedule finished is by the table reading. Next up will be the foundation of the my actual blocking plot, so we have at least a starting point for the scenes during the blocking rehearsals. I'm sure there will more than a few modifications as we get to work on the stage, and probably more as we move on into later rehearsals.

    Scenic Design icon
    Set Construction
    Speaking of the stage, our scenic designer, Red Newman, intends to have the platforms for the set in place by the time we start the table read this Monday; so, when we start blocking on the next Monday, we will have our actual playing space to work on. That is a very good thing. It's always better to get the blocking down, from the get-go, in the actual space, on the actual stage where the performances will be. Of course, good actors can make the adjustment from temporary spaces to the real ones, but why deal with it if we don't have to?

    Anyway, I greatly appreciate that Red is making sure we have our playing space as early as possible ‐‐ quite literally the day after the Radio Golf set will be struck. Another of my missions between this Monday and the next will be to get at least temporary set pieces onto that playing space (desks, tables, chairs, etc.) If I can find what will be the actual set pieces, that's okay, too.


    PINCH-HITTING TONIGHT:

    BRIGHT STAR at BCT icon
    SOUND TECH ICON
    Tonight I am to punch-hit as the sound tech for the performance of Bright Star at BCT. The original plan was for me to deal with the SFX, while another pinch-hitter worked the mixing board on the mics. However, that gentleman has a potential conflict that may come up that he won't be able to avoid if it does.

    The bottom line is that I may end up on both the sound cues and the mic cues. I actually have not rehearsed the mic mixing, but, I'm not too worried about it if I have to take the job on.

    "Famous last words," right?



    Sat, Sep 9, 2023

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    BLOCKING AND STUDY AND MUSIC:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    Blocking icon
    Shortly after I upload today's blogpost I'll get back to scheduling what we cover in each of the blocking rehearsals. I had to take a break from it yesterday because of my pinch-hit obligation to BCT's Bright Star perfomance last night. I was gong to at least work a little on it during lunch at the rent-payer, but I had personal business that I needed to deal with. But most of this weekend will be about getting the blocking schedule finalized, until it's done, which I might be able to accomplish in the session I'm about to embark on this Saturday morning.

    Then, of course, the next new job is to work on the base blocking plan for the scenes before we go into the blocking rehearsals on September 18. I could start that this weekend, but I think I want to wait until I see the actual playing space this Monday, which scenic designer, Red Newman intends to have in place by then, at least the platforms. I have the concept sketch, but it's not to scale and the different areas (platforms, etc.) are not truly proportionate against each other.

    Script Analysis icon
    What I'll do when I'm finished with the blocking schedule this weekend is go back and do more script analysis. There are all kinds of things to go deeper into, including my visions of each of the characters, which I will collaborate with each actor to get to fully-realized people on the stage. There's also gaining deeper thoughts and understandings about the overall story, as well as the stories for each character and the various couplings of them. And there's more for me to look at and decide upon regarding technical things: lights, props, set pieces, costumes, production music, sound effects, etc., etc.

    Production Music icon
    Musical Composition
    K.L. on Bass
    On the subject of production music, many of my upcoming weekends will be taken up, to some large extent, by composing and recording the scene transition music for the show. You five regulars here will recall that I will be doing this music on my basses ‐‐ the Embassy Pro bass and the Viola bass for certain, and maybe the Giannini acoustic bass, too; not sure on that last one, but the two electric basses are locked in. I also have some music that I created a few years back that I will be using for underscore, after I remaster the recordings.


    DID I SAY, "FAMOUS LAST WORDS"?:

    BRIGHT STAR at BCT icon
    SOUND TECH ICON
    I repeat myself when I'm under stress I repeat myself when I'm under stress I repeat myself when I'm under stress I repeat myself when I'm under stress I repeat myself when I'm under stress I repeat myself when I'm under stress I repeat myself when I'm under stress

    When I made my little "famous last words" crack in the last blogpost, I intended it to be facetious. It turns out is was either a self-fulling-prophesy or a psychic premonition. My one-night stint as the sound tech for Bright Star at BCT had its problems. Rather than only doing the SFX cues, I did have to also mix the mics during the show because the gentleman who was to come in and do that, to cover that part of the regular sound tech's work, could not make it because of that potential conflict I mention in yesterday's post. Now, I did write the mic cues in the script, but I never actually ran those cues ever before last night. I had never rehearsed mixing the show. The result was that, more than once, a mic or two was not turned on or muted when such should have been. It also took me well into Act One to start getting the volume levels to a good place.

    Here's a thing: sound techs should not be running sound from a booth. They should be in the back of the house, actually in the theatre with the audience. That's where one can hear the actual dynamics of the sound volumes against the room atmosphere and against any orchestra or band that is playing. It's true for mic balance, and it's true for sound effects volumes.

    Rant over. Back to last night. The sound tech made quite a few errors. Everyone was gracious, kind, and understanding, which I appreciate. But, still: DAMN IT!


    GOING TO PITTSBURGH LATER THIS AFTERNOON:

    AUGUST WILSON'S RADIO GOLF, by August Wilson at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    In the audience icon
    I'm attending the 5:00 performance of August Wilson's Radio Golf at The Guild. I haven't seen a full run of the show. When I shot the promotional trailer, during Tech Week, I stayed long enough to get at least 45 seconds or so of interesting movement from the cast for the DV movie. But, I left that evening knowing that this cast is on fire, and that, no surprise, the script is excellent. Between that and the great buzz the show has been generating, I am much looking forward to the experience.


    Sun, Sep 10, 2023

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    THE WEDNESDAY PART OF MY WEEKEND:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    Blocking icon
    Indeed I was able to get the schedule of blocking rehearsals done in that session right after I uploaded yesterday's blogpost. The last thing it is, is the show in continuity from start to finish. Frankly it jumps around like a movie shoot. But this stage is about "Say that, then cross down left to the up stage side of the desk," etc., etc. We'll be getting into the flow of continuity when we start running acts, then the whole show, in October. The last two weeks of September are the mechanical blocking sessions.

    In REHEARSAL icon
    I'd declared that my next thing would be to spend the rest of this weekend back on Script analysis, but I've realized I should actually plan out the rest of the rehearsal schedule, which will include a few TBA nights to accommodate working on problem points that creep up, or, for potential nights off.

    Script Analysis icon
    Nevertheless, I do hope to squeeze in at least one pass through reading the script before I go to bed tonight.


    Closing Today

    AUGUST WILSON'S RADIO GOLF, by August Wilson's at The Dayton Theatre Guild.

    Directed by Robert-Wayne Waldron
    Produced by Rick Flynn

    August Wilson's Radio Golf follows a black man named Harmond Wilks on his quest to revive his childhood neighborhood and become the first black mayor of Pittsburgh. He finds himself on the verge of the business breakthrough of a lifetime, but the arrival of an unexpected visitor and surprising news leads Harmond to choose between his personal aspirations and his integrity. With humor and courage, this play challenges the steep price "progress" can exact upon the soul.

    The Cast of AUGUST WILSON'S RADIO GOLF

    CHARACTER
          ACTOR
    Harmond Wilks
          S. Francis Livisay

    Mame Wilks
          Jena Perry

    Roosevelt Hicks
          Lessley Scott

    Sterling Johnson
          Andre Tomlinson

    Old Joe Barlow
          Franklin Johnson

    The promotional trailer for AUGUST WILSON'S RADIO GOLF

    In the audience icon
    I saw the show yesterday and must say it was as good as I was sure it would be. Major kudos to Robert-Wayne Waldron and his excellent cast for bringing this fine script to life with such in-your-face ferver. And kudos to the production team: Red Newman (scenic designer), Andrew Darr (lighting designer), Sarah Saunders (sound designer/sound tech), Melissa Ertsgaard (stage manager), Rhea Smith (light tech), and Rick Flynn (producer/prop manager).


    TWO THEATRE STRIKES TODAY ‐‐ BUT NOT THE LABOR STRIKE KIND:

    GENERAL THEATRE STUFF ICON
    I'm in this weird situation today where I need to be at two set strikes for two shows: Bright Star at BCT and August Wilson's Radio Golf at The Guild. And, they're both 3:00 mantinées. The good thing is that Radio Golf is a good half-hour or more longer. So, I can go to BCT and at least deal with the items I brought and set up, then head to DTG just about in time for that strike to start. Then go home and get back to the Wednesday's Child work I wrote of above.


    Mon, Sep 11, 2023

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    NOT JUST
    Anne Foxbank

    It's not just New York
    It's not just Washington
    It's not just Shanksville
    It's not just the buildings
    It's not just the airplanes
    It's not just the field
    It's not just the symbols
    It's not just the pictures
    It's not just the dead
    It's not just the heroes
    It's not just the hearts
    It's not just the sorrow
    It's not just the nation

    © 2002 Anne Foxbank, all rights reserved
    appears here by permission


    TONIGHT WE ARE ON THE FIELD!:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    In REHEARSAL icon
    GAME ON! icon

    NOPE ICON
    YEP ICON
    I did manage to work out the entire rehearsal schedule for the show, yesterday. However, I did not get to a script analysis reading last night as I'd hoped I would. I was simply too tired to well attend to one, and I opted to go to bed a little early, instead.

    No worries.


    Meanwhile, tonight, rehearsals officially begin with our first read-through ‐‐ plus various production business that will be attended to. I am quite pumped to get this game afoot! I can't wait to start collaborating with these fine actors that are assembled to tell this most-interesting story.

    xxxx
    xxxx
    xxxx
    Yesterday, on my patio, working to complete the rehearsal schedule.



    THE THIRD SHOW OF THE DTG SEASON:

    TRUE WEST, by Sam Shepard at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Producer icon
    AUDITION ICON

    To a small extent, for now, I'll also don the producer's hat for the next Guild show, True West, by Sam Shepard. Auditions for that are Nov 6 & 7. Click here for audition information, (3 men; 1 woman).



    Tue, Sep 12, 2023

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    AND WE'RE OFF....:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    In REHEARSAL icon
    We've started off the rehearsal period with a good table read last night. Plus our costumer, Barb Jorgensen, came in to coordinate with the cast a little bit. And, of course, our producer, Scott Madden did his producer's business with the cast. Being the first table reading, we did not stop and I gave no directions nor notes to the cast.

    Tonight we will do table work on Act 1, and tomorrow, Act 2. I will give direction. As well, we as a group will do Script analysis both nights. I'll pose questions to actors about their character's motivations, mindset, emotions, yadda, yadda. And the cast can pose their own questions, make their own observations, share their interpretations, etc., etc. We're about to go into two-and-a-half weeks of almost purely mechanical rehearsals (blocking rehearsals), where the focus will not be character work, so I want a foundation on character and story laid before we get to that.



    Thu, Sep 14, 2023

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    ON TO THE NEXT PHASE:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    In REHEARSAL icon
    Script Analysis icon
    Our Wednesday's Child rehearsals are absolutely off to a strong start. The last two nights we did table work, with at least the overall beginning foundations of character work laid and a nice dose of script analysis from the room as a whole. Unequivocally I can say that I am most pleased at this early juncture. I happy with my casting choices.

    Blocking icon
    We'll be back Monday evening to start our blocking rehearsals. Including today, most of the cast has the next four days off; some have more than that. I do not. I will be spending the next several days plotting out the initial blocking for the show. I have to plot the whole show out, despite that we are jumping around in the script, because with whatever scene we are blocking, whenever we are blocking it, the actors need to know from what place on stage or off stage they are entering each scene. So I need to determine those starting points, and the best way to do that is to block the whole show. I start tonight, and if I stay on it I should be done by bedtime Saturday, or before.

    Sunday I have a wedding to attend: two local actors who are also fellow DTG Board members, Jared Mola and Kayla Graham.

    xxxx
    An example of my reuse of Painter to help me visualize the blocking of the show. With icons for Becca, Susan, and Dixon visible and placed in a scene.
    Corel Painter 2023 icon
    To plot the blocking, I'm repurposing my Corel Painter software. I'm utilizing its graphics layer attribute to assist me. There's a base image of an aerial-perspective sketch of the set; it's not precisely to scale, but it's close enough for my purpose. Then I've created little circles, each with the initials of a character, and each with a unique color. I can make each circle visible or I can hide it depending on who I am dealing with on stage at any given moment. And I can reposition them. This will give me a visual reference as I am working through the script and blocking each page.

    This will be the first time I will actually block for a Guild audience. Though it was done on The Guild mainstage, when I directed The Roommate, our only offering during the 20/21 season, that was directed for the camera, being an on-line production. I did not have to concern myself with the sight lines for the audience members, sitting in the seats on the three sides of our thrust stage. I was actually kind of bummed about that. I've been looking forward to the challenge of staging a play on our stage for a long time.

    Of course, whatever blocking I conjure over the next few days, it's all fair game for tweaking, revising, or completely replacing as it later may be deemed appropriate.



    Sun, Sep 17, 2023

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    BLOCKING NOW, MUSIC SOON:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    In REHEARSAL icon
    Blocking icon
    Thursday evening marked the start of my plotting the blocking for the show. I was at home, using the image of the sketch of the stage, rendered in a RIFF file in my Corel Painter 2023. I had thought that the sketch not being more to scale and to correct proportion wasn't going to be an issue, but I found that it was. In conjunction, I had other thoughts about staging, such the replacement of set pieces and other ideas that made me realize I needed to go to the theatre and plot this out in the space, in the house with the stage, AKA: the L. David Mirkin Main Stage.

    Friday evening, then yesterday afternoon, after the morning DTG board meeting & brunch with some fellow board members, I was in the space, finishing out the initial blocking plan for the show. I finished Act 1 Friday evening, which included going back and re-plotting some things I'd worked out Thursday. I also switched out some set pieces for others that work better for the show, in most cases as I came to plotting the scene where the original's problem became obvious to me. Saturday afternoon, after the board meeting and brunch, I plotted Act 2, again, swapping out some set pieces on occasion. At about 4:00, yesterday afternoon, I finished.

    There are some scenes that happen off the main set, and I played around with the best spots on the thrust to stage them and I believe I have found those spots. The big issue is where to place them so as many audience members as possible will see most of the action in the scene ‐‐ i.e.: the actors' faces, mostly. On a thrust stage, every audience member has their turn at a bad view, usually, for at least a few seconds during most scenes, but you want to make sure nobody has a bad view for too long.

    Of course, all this placement staging as well as all this initial blocking plot are subject to change during the course of rehearsal as we perfect the show. Tomorrow night the cast begins showing up for two weeks of blocking rehearsals, with no one called to every rehearsal, so no one's Mondays‐through‐Thursdays (no Friday rehearsals) are filled with this show until we get to the rehearsal runs of full acts. Well, actually, there will be one night before that, when we will run complicated sections of the show, to work on timing and pace, which will happen right before we start running acts.

    But tomorrow night, and for the next two weeks, it's all about: Enter from the up stage right escape and cross down to the down stage end of your desk, yadda yadda yadda....

    Production Music icon
    Musical Composition
    K.L. on Bass
    Next weekend I will start several weekends of composing, recording, mixing, and mastering scene transition music for the show. However, to be honest, much of the time there won't be much mixing involved as a heavy amount of the music will be solo bass riffs on my Embassy Pro and Viola basses, and, as I wrote before, maybe on my Giannini acoustic bass. I haven't ruled out percussion in some pieces, and perhaps some specific types of sound effects, and such pieces would need mixing. Also, as I indicated in previous blogposts, I'll be at least remastering, if not also remixing, some music, which I created almost a decade ago, as further production music for Wednesday's Child. As for the scene-transition music, I have some ideas and concepts, but nothing wholly formulated. It'll gel as I'm working on the music.

    xxxx
    Plotting out the blocking at home Thursday evening.
    xxxx
    Back at it in the Mirkin Main Stage space at The Guild, Friday evening.
    xxxx
    A break and pizza for dinner at the theatre Friday night.
    xxxx
    Finishing up the blocking plot, yesterday afternoon.
    xxxx
    The last page, blocked.
    xxxx
    Grabbing some set-piece chairs from the upstairs prop area.



    Fri, Sep 22, 2023

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    REHEARSAL WEEK 2 IS IN THE BOOKS:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    In REHEARSAL icon
    Blocking icon

    This week, our second, we did the first half of our blocking rehearsals. Monday, we got off to a good start with five of the seven cast members, then the same five on Tuesday. Only one of our cast was not called to at least one rehearsal this week ‐‐ remember, not all cast members are called to every rehearsal until we got to the full runs of the show, though some are called more often due to being in more scenes.

    Just as to be expected, there were some tweaks to the blocking I'd plotted out for the scenes we worked, especially Monday night. All of it had to do with the tight space the actors have to work in on some locations of the set and the number cast members who occupy those spaces during certain scenes. But between myself, SM Doug Patten, and the actors themselves, alterations have been made that work.

    This was the blocking M.O. for all four rehearsals, and will be for next week, too. The tweaks for more than simply the scenes where the space ended up being tighter than anticipated or desired. When I auditioned this show I was looking for evedence of actor's instincts in those who took to the boards. It was mostly their instincts for what might be a good reading of the lines for the character they were auditioning for. Some actors I know and already knew or had a strong idea of their instincts, but the new faces, I had to discern that from the audition, naturally. I have a cast of actors with good instincts, so, it behooves me to pay attention to their thoughts and interpretations. This should be a collaboration, even if I get final say. They have also given me good ideas for blocking, and I have been smart enough to go with many of those ideas. Though, of course, in terms of the blocking, every movement and placement that has been determined is subject to later revision.

    Tuesday, it was same five actors as Monday, then Wednesday and yesterday had some change ups. We actually only worked with three actors Wednesday and two yesterday. What I'm glad about, and that I actually built into the blocking rehearsal schedule, is that we've been wrapping the rehearsals early, circa 8:30-ish each night rather than going to 9:00. I promised during the auditions that I would make 9:00 the goal for wrapping rehearsals until we got to full runs of the show, and that if we did go past 9:00 before then, I'd try to make sure not to go too far past 9:00. Between that and the fact that right now no one is called every night, we're not taking up too much of the actors' time during the week until we get to the second half, or so, of our rehearsal process.

    Props icon
    On another front, our props manager, Sarah Saunders, who will also be our sound tech, has been getting busy on the show's properties, having already given me some good options for several key props, including an important prop that makes limited but vital appearances; I'd say it was a MacGuffin, but that's not exactly true.

    Set Piece icon
    Our set pieces are also relatively complete, I'd put them in the neighborhood of 90% chosen. We still have a few "do-fers," (as in: "they'll do for now"), a couple that Scenic Designer Red Newman is going to replace with ones he builds, and one other that will be replaced with something SM Doug and I will retrieve this evening from Beavercreek Community Theatre, that which was left there by Jeff Sams (used during Bright Star), and is being donated to DTG by Franklin High School.

    Production Music icon
    Musical Composition
    K.L. on Bass
    Starting tonight I launch multi-weekends of composing/recording sessions to create production music for the show with my Embassy Pro and Viola basses. The pieces will all be quite short, most averaging around ten seconds, or so, as scene transition music. I may compose one that is a couple minutes long to use as movie underscore in the promotional trailer. But for the stage production, nothing needs to be too terribly long, though I may create a few at about 30-45 seconds just to cover any potentially long scene changes, though we are hoping to keep anything longer than a few seconds to a bare minimum.

    You five regulars may recall that I will also be remastering some music I created back in 2014. It's ambient music that was originally created as preshow music for the Dayton Playhouse production of George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead™ Live. There are five different tracks and I will use them for the live-theatre underscore of specific scenes in the play. As for preshow and intermission music, I have been gradually looking at what I want to curate for these. I also plan to use music other than my own for the curtain call music, and I already have the recording, by someone else, that we will be going out of Act 1 with, based heavily on the written suggestion in the script from Playwright Mark St. Germain.

    So...... onward......



    Mon, Sep 25, 2023

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    PRODUCTION MUSIC THIS JUST-PAST WEEKEND, BLOCKING, PHASE 2, STARTS TONIGHT:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    Production Music icon
    Musical Composition
    AUDIO RECORDING - ENGINEERING ICON
    TASCAM DP-24SD 24-TRACK DIGITAL PORTASTUDIO RECORDER ICON
    K.L. on Bass

    The plan was to start Friday night, but I didn't get to the production music until Saturday evening. But between then and yesterday evening, I have most of the scene transitions in Act 1 covered. There are a few transitions that will have that ambient music I've written of above that will then also be underscore for the scene moved into. There's also one transition that I will be programming a drum track for, using GarageBand, probably, because I haven't yet mastered the drum programming in Logic Pro ‐‐ something I really ought to take on, at some point. I will further add that for one transition piece I double-tracked the Viola bass, with one track being a rhythm that I beat out with my fingers on deadened strings; I like it.

    Saturday, I composed and performed on my Embassy Pro bass, that with the roundwound strings for the more metalic, punchy sound. It felt to me like some transitions need that, and having now laid the tracks, I find that is correct. Conversely, some need the more mellow, softer (if you will) tone and attack of the flatwound strings on my Viola bass, which was what I wrote and recorded with last night. I haven't yet pulled out the Giannini acoustic bass and I'm not sure I will.

    if you're wondering, I recorded on my Tascam 24-Track recorder. As for finishing the production music off, I predict one or two more weekend will do it, including the mixing and mastering.

    In REHEARSAL icon
    Blocking icon
    Tonight we hit week 2 of the blocking rehearsals, which will round up the predominance of the initial blocking ‐‐ though we have some special blocking that will be dealt with at the start of next week, and that I'll comment on at a later date. Yes, yes, there's still that caveat that all blocking is subject to revision at a later time, well, virtually all.

    xxxx
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    Saturday evening, composing & recording with the Embassy Pro.
    Listening to playback, Saturday night.
    xxxx
    xxxx
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    Last night, on the Viola bass, for mellower tone & attack.



    Fri, Sep 29, 2023

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    41 years clean and sober
    On the 29th of September, 1982, I came off of what has been, up to today, and most probably will always be, my last drunk. I claim this as my sobriety date. Since that time I have not indulged in any alcohol, pot, or any other mind or mood altering substances, save for a few necessary instances in the ER or while on the surgery table.

    As I have written on past sobriety anniversaries, I most certainly did not do this alone. I reached out to a community of fellow alcoholics and attics who have found a solution to their addictions, shared that solution with me, and gave me strong, loving support as I took on the task of learning sober living.

    But it's important to state, and for me to remember, that I HAD to be a part of the solution. I had to take action. I had to do things to changed my thinking and my human spiritual condition. I would not have been able to do so without the wonderful love and support of my fellows. But, if I had not taken the action, the solution would not have come to be. Believe me, my execution was less than perfect, far less than perfect, but that's okay; as it turns out, everybody's action toward sober living is imperfect. The phrase I heard a lot was, "progress not perfection."

    But here's what I know: I have seen so many introduced to the solution, either by force or through their own cries for help, who would not, for some reason, could not, take the actions. And I have seen such people die, or live years in the misery and dispare of alcoholism and addiction, taking their loved ones along with them.

    I have certainly not had the life of a king. I have, however had nothing close to a bad life. And though I often feel like I have achieved very little, I would not have the good things in my life I have today had I not finally had enough of the crappy life I was living in late September of 1982 and reached out, in defeat, to a community of strangers who would soon become my great friends and life mentors, who showed me what I had to do and held me up on the days that it seemed imposible that I could do it. Not only would I not have this life, I might have already been dead for a long time now. I'm grateful I was desperate enough to reach out and somehow, miraculously managed to let those loving people lift me up.

    REHEARSAL WEEK 3, DOWN & MORE MUSIC WORK:

    WEDNESDAY'S CHILD, by Mark St. Germain at The Dayton Theatre Guild
    DTG Director icon
    In REHEARSAL icon
    Blocking icon
    This week, a little bit of schedule reshuffling had to be done because one of the cast members had an emergency conflict come up. So our Wednesday night blocking rehearsal was cut a little short since we couldn't block scenes the actor who was absent is in. Those scenes were moved to last night, which was not much of a shake-up since last night was originally scheduled as a lighter rehearsal to begin with, so adding the missed scenes didn't turn it into a long night. Essential which night was the lighter night was simply flipped.

    Next Monday and Tuesday we have special blocking-type rehearsals of a different nature, which I probably won't go into detail about or even share much about here until I get to the post-mortem essay in November, after the show has closed. I will say that I am bringing someone in who is trained to help us with certain aspects of some scenes and that I am looking forward to the learning experience the two evenings offer.

    Intermission Music icon
    Preshow Music icon
    Sound Effects icon
    Musical Composition
    Production Music icon
    SOUND DESIGNING ICON
    K.L. on Bass
    The second installment of composing and recording production music theoretically begins this evening ‐‐ but, ya know, that's what I wrote last week about last Friday night, and I didn't get to it until late Saturday afternoon.

    I'll also shortly start attending more to curating, for the show, music by other artists, music that will play on a particular character's stereo in a few scenes, and music that will be on a bar's sound system in another. I also have not yet decided what I am using as curtain call music. I have a few choices for the curtain call but before I settle on the finalist, I want to add a few more candidates.

    It will soon be time to fully curate the preshow and intermission music. First, all the rejected choices as the curtain music are pretty likely to make the cut, as well one or two others by the same artists. Plus, a song or two more by any artists, who differ from the curtain-music rejects, will probably make the grade as production music; it'll be any artists' music that seems to fit the feel and/or the theme and/or the characters of the play. I have set a parameter that all the artists be female and at this point I'm not going to alter that rule. It's close to time to start gathering the SFX files, too, although this show is going to be pretty light on sound effects. There'll be a good amount of sound cues, but most of them will be music: production music, plus, of course, preshow and intermission music.

    K.L.'s Artist's Blog, (previously K.L.'s Blog: a Diary of Artful Things), © 2004-2024 K.L.Storer ‐‐ all rights reserved

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